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Faculty Image Lisa Eby
Office: BioResearch 103
Phone: (406) 243-5984
Email: lisa.eby@umontana.edu

 

Description:

Dr. Lisa Eby is an Associate Professor of Aquatic Vertebrate Ecology at The University of Montana. She received her B.S. in Zoology and M.S. in Limnology and Oceanography from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from Duke University. After working briefly as a postdoctoral researcher at Arizona State University, she was hired by the College of Forestry and Conservation here in Montana.  Her previous research has spanned a range of questions and ecosystems from examining chronic stress (low oxygen zones) and catastrophic disturbances (floods and hurricanes) on individuals, populations, and communities in estuaries, to exploring the role of population shifts on food web interactions and trophic transfer in lakes, to analyzing long-term community changes in desert stream fish communities.

Research Interests:

Aquatic Ecology and Fish Ecology
Population and Community Ecology
Food web interactions
Influence of landscape and habitat changes on aquatic systems

Student Chapter of the American Fisheries Society

Courses:

Fish Biology and Management: This class explores the biology of fishes, the most diverse group of vertebrates.  The areas treated include morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of fishes to their aquatic environments, as well as aspects of population, community, and applied ecology. We will be discussing both freshwater and marine fishes with an emphasis placed on freshwater fishes native to Montana.

Advanced Fisheries: This course introduces some of the fundamental principles of inland fisheries ecology and management.  Through a case study approach I hope that you begin to understand (1) the quantitative nature of fish population assessment, (2) the complexity of ecological interactions linking fish to other components of aquatic communities and ecosystems, and (3) the challenge of balancing multiple human values in managing fisheries resources.

Fisheries Field Interships: In this class an internship is arranged with a management agency, NGO, or other sponsor.  The goal is to provide the student with hands-on experience as varied as possible, subject to seasonal opportunities.  The student must (1) work 120 hours, (2) meet with me periodically throughout the semester to discuss their activities and progress, and (3) submit a review paper regarding a fisheries issue they encountered during their internship.

Research Design: In this class we review scientific methods, critically thinking about questions posed in research, and the approach taken to collect data to answer them.  Specifically we explore issues of scientific inference, examine classic experimental and survey design, and investigate quasi-experiments.  Within this class the students review literature in their field, practice designing experiments and surveys, as well as analyzing data.

Seminars previously offered:  Topics in Fish Ecology, Food Webs and Landscapes, Estuarine Ecology
 

Education:

Ph.D. Ecology, Duke University 2001
M.S. Limnology and Oceanography, University of Wisconsin 1995
B.S. Zoology, University of Wisconsin 1991

Selected Publications:

McCaffery, M., T.A. Switalski, L.A Eby. 2007. Effects of road decommissioning on stream habitat characteristics in the South Fork Flathead River, Montana. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 136:553-561.
 
L.A. Eby, W. J. Roach, L.B. Crowder, and J.A. Stanford. 2006. Stocking up freshwater food webs: effects on food web and ecosystem functioning. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 21:576-584.
 
Aumann, C.A., L.A. Eby, and W.F. Fagan. 2006. How transient patches affect population dynamics: the case of hypoxia and blue crabs. Ecological Monographs 76(3):415-438.
 
Hans W. Paerl, L.M. Valdes, A.R. Joyner, B.L. Peierls, M.F. Piehler, S.R. Riggs, R.R. Christian, L.A. Eby, L.B. Crowder, J.S. Ramus, E.J. Clesceri, C.P. Buzzelli, R.A. Luettich, Jr. 2006. Ecological impacts of a recent increase in frequency of Atlantic hurricanes in the Pamlico Sound System, NC: Implications for Assessment and Management of Large Estuaries.  Estuaries 29(S).
 
Eby, L.A., L.B. Crowder, C.M. McClellan, C.H. Peterson, and M.J. Powers. 2005. Habitat degradation from intermittent hypoxia: impacts on demersal estuarine fishes. Marine Ecology Progress Series 291:249-262.
 
Eby, L.A., and L.B. Crowder. 2004. Effects of hypoxic disturbances on an estuarine fish and crustacean community: a multi-scale approach. Estuaries 27(2): 342-351
 
Eby, L.A., W.F. Fagan, W.L. Minckley. 2003. Variability and dynamics of a desert stream community.   Ecological Applications 13(6):1566-1579.
 
Ramus, J., L.A. Eby, C.M. McClellan, and L.B. Crowder. 2003. Phytoplankton forcing by a record freshwater discharge event into a lagoonal estuary. Estuaries 26(5):1344-1352.
 
Eby, L.A., and L.B. Crowder. 2002. Hypoxia-based habitat compression in the Neuse River Estuary: context-dependent shifts in behavioral avoidance thresholds. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science 59:952-965.
 
Lewis, D.B., and L.A. Eby.   2002. Spatially heterogeneous refugia and predation risk in intertidal salt marshes. Oikos 96(1):120-130.
 
Selberg, C., L. Eby, and L. Crowder. 2001. Hypoxia in the Neuse River Estuary: responses of blue crabs and crabbers. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 21:358-366.
 
Paerl, H. W., J. D. Bales, L.W. Ausley, C.P. Buzzelli, L.B. Crowder, L.A. Eby, M. Go, B.L. Peierls, T. L. Richardson, and J.S. Ramus. 2001.   Ecosystem impacts of 3 sequential hurricanes (Dennis, Floyd and Irene) on the US's largest lagoonal estuary, Pamlico Sound, NC. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science: 98(10):5655-5660.
 
Paerl, H. W., J. D. Bales, L.W. Ausley, C.P. Buzzelli, L.B. Crowder, L.A. Eby, M. Go, B.L. Peierls, T. L. Richardson, and J.S. Ramus.  2000. Recent hurricanes result in continuing ecosystem impacts on USA's largest lagoonal estuary: Pamlico Sound, NC. EOS 81(40):457.
 
Eby, L.A., C.A. Stow, R.J. Hesselberg, and J.F. Kitchell. 1997. Interactions of growth and diet in PCB accumulation of Lake Michigan bloaters (Coregonus hoyi). Ecological Applications 7(3):981-990.
 
Schindler, D.E. and L.A. Eby. 1997. Interactions between growth rates and the stoichiometry of fishes and their prey: implications for nutrient recycling. Ecology 78(6):1816-1831.
 
Stow C.A., S.R. Carpenter, C.P. Madenjian, L.A. Eby, and L.J. Jackson. 1996. Fisheries management options to reduce human contaminant exposure from Lake Michigan fish consumption. Bioscience 45(11):752-758.
 
Stow C.A., S.R. Carpenter, L.A. Eby, J.F. Amhrein, and R.J. Hesselberg. 1995. Evidence that PCBs are approaching stable concentrations in Lake Michigan fishes. Ecological Applications 5(1):248-260.
 
Eby, L.A., L.G. Rudstam, and J.F. Kitchell. 1995. Predator responses to prey population dynamics: an empirical analysis based on lake trout growth rates. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science 52:1564-1571.
 
Kitchell J.F., S.R. Carpenter, L.A. Eby, X. He, D.E. Schindler, and R.A. Wright. 1994. Predator-prey dynamics in an ecosystem context. Journal of Fish Biology 45(A):209-226.