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Faculty Image Trina Valencich
Office: Chem 413
Phone: 406-243-5227
Email: trina.valencich@umontana.edu

 

Description:

Trina Valencich joined the UM chemistry faculty in 1993 as a faculty associate. She received her Ph.D. degree in 1974 under the directorship of Don L. Bunker. Prior to joining the UM faculty, she was associate professor at California State University, Los Angeles. Trina Valencich is a theoretical physical chemist specializing in fundamental reaction processes. She teaches physical chemistry at the graduate and undergraduate level.

Field Of Study:

How the rates of chemical reactions and energy exchange processes are influenced by the identity of elements, and groups of elements is the focus of my research efforts. Many approaches are used by chemists in this general area. We combine experimental data, collected by other researchers, with computational methods to examine fundamental issues. Quantum techniques are used to probe the fundamental forces between atoms in neutral and charged groups. Computer generated graphics and mathematical programs, like Mathematica, help to fit this information to functional models. The time dependence part of some problems is treated with semiclassical Monte Carlo trajectory calculations. These calculations are used to evolve nuclear positions and the flow of energy in binary collisions between atoms and molecules with photons, ions, molecules and solids. Our interest in the behavior of elementary collisions has led us to computer generated animation. We also employ stochastic simulations to treat complex mixtures of gases with energized entities.

Research Interests:

How the rates of chemical reactions and energy exchange processes are influenced by the identity of elements, and groups of elements is the focus of my research efforts. Many approaches are used by chemists in this general area. We combine experimental data, collected by other researchers, with computational methods to examine fundamental issues. Quantum techniques are used to probe the fundamental forces between atoms in neutral and charged groups. Computer generated graphics and mathematical programs, like Mathematica, help to fit this information to functional models. The time dependence part of some problems is treated with semiclassical Monte Carlo trajectory calculations. These calculations are used to evolve nuclear positions and the flow of energy in binary collisions between atoms and molecules with photons, ions, molecules and solids. Our interest in the behavior of elementary collisions has led us to computer generated animation. We also employ stochastic simulations to treat complex mixtures of gases with energized entities.

Courses:

Chemistry 101N

Chemistry 161N Lab

Chemistry 162N Lab

Education:

Trina Valencich joined the UM chemistry faculty in 1993 as a faculty associate. She received her Ph.D. degree in 1974 under the directorship of Don L. Bunker. Prior to joining the UM faculty, she was associate professor at California State University, Los Angeles. Trina Valencich is a theoretical physical chemist specializing in fundamental reaction processes. She teaches physical chemistry at the graduate and undergraduate level.

Selected Publications:

“Theoretical Approaches to the Hot Atom Chemistry of Hydrogen.” The Handbook of Hot Atom Chemistry, Trina Valencich. Ed.: J.P. Adloff, P.P. Gaspar, M. Imamura, A.G. Maddock, T. Matsuura, H. Sano and K.Yoshihara; Kodansha Ltd., Tokyo and VCH Pub. Inc., New York, 1992, 188-209.

“A Comparative Study of Potential Energy Surfaces for CH3 + H21 >CH4 + H,” Rozeanne Steckler, Kenneth J. Dykema, Franklin B. Brown, Gene C. Hancock, Donald G. Truhlar, and Trina Valencich. J. Chem. Phys., 87, 1987, 7024.

“Hot Atom Systems” The Sensitivity of the Collision Spectrum to Ionic Energy Loss Processes and Reactive Depletion." Trina Valencich, Chem. Phys. Lett., 104, 1984, 620.

“Trajectory Studies of Hot Atom Reactions, III. On the Information Content of Recoil Experiments.” Trina Valencich, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 1983, 671.