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David L. Moore, Professor

Office
Location: LA 120
Hours: Tuesdays 3:45-5; Wednesdays 3-4pm, and many other times by appointment.  Call me at 406-243-6708, or email david.moore@umontana.edu to set up an appointment.  It's best to arrange a specific time, even during posted office hours, in case I'm with another student or at the copy machine.  

Contact
Phone: (406) 243-5231
Email: david.moore@umontana.edu


Teaching Experience

Teaching literature and writing since my first graduate teaching assistantship in 1974:

University of South Dakota 1974-1979

Salish Kootenai College 1982-1989

University of Washington 1989-1992

Cornell University 1994-1999

University of Montana 1999-present

 

Research Interests

Native American Literature -- William Apess, Sarah Winnemucca, D'Arcy McNickle, Leslie Marmon Silko, Sherman Alexie, Joy Harjo, Simon Ortiz, Craig Womack, Ray Young Bear, Gerald Vizenor, Debra Earling, James Welch, Louise Erdrich, Adrian Louis

American Studies -- (see Native authors above, plus:) Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Rebecca Harding Davis, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Robert Hayden, Robert Duncan, Charles Olson

Environment and Literature, Ecocriticism -- Makah whaling, David Abram, Annie Dillard

Peace Studies -- Lewis Hill, Pacifica Radio, nonviolent communication, global government

Baha'i Studies -- spiritual dialectics & dialogics, history & principles of the Baha'i Faith

Critical Theory -- Deleuze and Guattari, Mikhail Bakhtin, Gerald Vizenor, Craig Womack

Selected Publications

Spring 2008 List of Major Publications

 

Book

“That dream shall have a name”: Native Americans Rewriting America, forthcoming from Nebraska UP.

 

Edited Volume

Cultural Property in American Indian Literatures: Representation and Interpretation.  Special issue of American Indian Quarterly.  21:4. (Fall 1997).

 

Articles, Chapters, & Reviews

“Ghost Dancing through History in Silko’s Gardens in the Dunes and Almanac of the Dead.”  Laura Coltelli, ed.  Reading Leslie Marmon Silko: Critical Perspectives through Gardens in the Dunes.  Pisa, Italy: Pisa UP (Association of American University Presses), 2007.  Lincoln: Nebraska UP, 2008.  91-118.

 

“Happiness That Sleeps With Sorrow.”  Studies in American Indian Literatures.  Special issue on James Welch.  18.3. (Fall 2006). 41-42.

 

"Cycles of Selfhood, Cycles of Nationhood:  Authenticity, Identity, Community, Sovereignty."  Chapter entry accepted in Deborah Madsen, ed.  Authenticity in Native American Literatures [working title].  Under consideration at Oklahoma UP.

 

"'The literature of this nation': LaVonne Ruoff and the Redefinition of American Literary Studies." Studies in American Indian Literatures. 17.2 (2005). 

 

“Sherman Alexie.”  Full-length essay entry in Cambridge Companion to Native American Literature.  Eds. Kenneth Roemer and Joy Porter.  Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2005. 297-310.

 

“‘The story goes its own way’: Simon Ortiz, Nationalism, and the Oral Poetics of Power.” Studies in American Indian Literatures.  16.4. (Winter 2004). 34-46.

 

“Art of Survival:  A Review of Duane Niatum’s The Crooked Beak of Love.”  The Raven Chronicles.  10:2 (2002).  67-70.

 

“Introduction” to Non-Fiction section. Nothing But the Truth: An Anthology of Native American Literature. Eds. John Purdy and James Ruppert.  Upper Saddle River, New Jersey:  Prentice Hall, 2001. 5-14.

 

“Return of the Buffalo:  Cultural Representation as Cultural Property,” Ed. Gretchen Bataille. Native American Representations: European and North American Perspectives. Lincoln: Nebraska UP, 2001.

 

“Silko’s Blood Sacrifice: The Circulating Witness in Almanac of the Dead.”  Eds. James Thorson and Louise Barnett. Leslie Marmon Silko: A Collection of Critical Essays.  Albuquerque: New Mexico UP, 1999:  149-183.

 

            “Introduction.” Special issue on "Cultural Property in American Indian Literatures: Representation and Interpretation." Ed. David L. Moore.  American Indian Quarterly.  21:4 (Fall 1997): 545-554.

 

“Rough Knowledge and Radical Understanding.”  Special issue on "Cultural Property in American Indian Literatures: Representation and Interpretation." Ed. David L. Moore.  American Indian Quarterly.  21:4 (Fall 1997): 633-662.

 

“Ray A. Young Bear,” Dictionary of Literary Biography. Vol. 175: “Native American Writers of the United States.”  Detroit, MI: Gale Research Co., 1997: 322-330.

 

"Articulate Silence and the Mythic Eye in Two Native American Writers," G.R.A.A.T.:  Publication des Groupes de Recherches Anglo-Americaines de l'Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours. 14 (1996) “Voix Ethniques Volume II”: 139-151.

 

"Decolonializing Criticism: Reading Dialectics and Dialogics in Native American Literatures," Studies in American Indian Literatures.  (Winter 1994): 7-33.

 

"Myth, History, and Identity in Silko and Young Bear: Postcolonial Praxis," New Voices: Critical Essays on Native American Literatures, ed. Arnold Krupat. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Press, 1993: 370-395.

 

Review of Duane Niatum’s Drawings of the Song Animals: New & Selected Poems in The Raven Chronicles.  2:2 (Winter 1993).

 

"Staying Afloat in a Chaotic World: A Conversation with Ray Young Bear," interview co-edited with Michael Wilson, Akwe:Kon Journal (Northeast Indian Quarterly), 9:4 (Winter 1992): 22-26.

 

Review of N. Scott Momaday’s The Ancient Child in The Seattle Times. December 17, 1989.

 

Field of Study

Native American Literature

American Studies

American Renaissance

Environment and Literature, Ecocriticism

Peace Studies

Baha'i Studies

Critical Theory

Courses

Writing Skills Handouts:  (Checklist for Writing a Literary Analysis Essay) (Peer Editing Checklist) (Prospectus how-to.doc)

Sample Student Papers:  (Sample Essay Assignment) (Sample Microtheme edit 1) (Model Microtheme 1)

LIT 210 American Literature to 1865 (F11 Syll & Sched)  (Essay 1)  (Essay 2)

LIT 211 American Literature since 1865

ENLT 225 American Literature since 1865 (225 S09 Syllabus & Sched)  (/225 Sp09 Essay 1.doc)

LIT 300 Literary Theory  (300 Sp 10)  (Syllabus & Schedule) (Macrotheme 1)

ENLT 329 Native American Literature (syllabus & schedule)

ENLT 331 The Many Voices of the American Renaissance (syllabus & schedule) (Emerson 's Cherokee Letter PDF)  (John Jacobs' A True Tale of Slavery PDF)  (Emerson_on_Slavery PDF West India Emancipation; Fugitive Slave Law; John Brown; Emancipation Proclamation)  (Sally Roesch Wagner Iroquois Infl on Women Rights.PDF)

LIT 342 Montana Literature (342 Sp 10 Syllabus & Schedule)

LIT 373 Literature and the Environment   (373 F11 Syllabus & Sched) (Owens "Burning the Shelter") (Zepeda "Birth Witness") (Salmon "Sharing Breath") (Percy re Loss of the Creature.pdf -- rotate under View Menu if nec)  (Selby re Snyder -- rotate under View Menu if nec.)   (Reed re Enviro Justice Ecocrit)  (Blaeser "Weight of Small Bodies")  (Bruchac "Edge of Ridge Road"  (Microtheme 1)  (Microtheme 2)  (Savoy & Deming -- Widening the Frame & Afterword)  (Essay on Unit 3)  (Nelson -- Becoming Metis)  (Adiele--Notes on the New World)  (Masumoto--Belonging to the Land)

LIT 420.01 Topics in Critical Theory: Ecocriticism (Fall 2010)  (Syll & Sched)

ENLT 421.02 Ecocriticism & Montana Literature ( syllabus & schedule)  (Scigaj--Referential Flux)  (Elder--Poetry of Experience)  (Re Essay 2--11/25 Students please note:  the server for this website is down, and I will try to email Essay 2 to the class via Cyberbear; please check your grizmail.)

ENLT 521.01 Graduate Seminar: Poetics of Peace (Spring 2008) (Poetics of Peace Syllabus & Schedule)

LIT 521.03 Graduate Seminar: Nature, Native, Nation (Fall 2010)  (Syllabus & Schedule) (Carroll Articulating Indigenous Statehood Revised 8-27.doc)

 

 

 

Publications

www.cas.umt.edu/facultydatabase/FILES_Faculty/573/What We Talk About When We Talk About Race 2.doc