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Faculty Image William Holben
Office: Health Sciences 503A
Phone: (406) 243-6163
Email: Bill.Holben@mso.umt.edu
Website: Click Here

 

Field Of Study:

Molecular microbial ecology

Research Interests:

Molecular microbial ecology, molecular genetics, and environmental microbiology.  Ongoing research projects include: Community-level analyses linking bacterial community structure, function, activity and diversity in metal-contaminated and pristine river sediment systems; exploring the role of the microbial community in the success of invasive weeds; examining the role of charcoal from forest fires in controlling the distribution and activity of nitrifying bacteria in forest soils; fate and transport of microbes in the environment; microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract; using the soil bacterial community as an early warning system for elevated CO2.

Education:

B.A. State University of New York at Fredonia, 1978
M.S. State University of New York at Buffalo, 1982
Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, 1985

Selected Publications:

Kovacik, W.P. Jr., K. Takai, M.R. Mormile, J.P. McKinley, F.J. Brockman, J.K. Fredrickson and W.E. Holben. 2005. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface cretaceous rock indicates abundant Fe(III)- and So-reducing bacteria in a sulfate-rich environment. Environ. Microbiol: doi: 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2005.00876.x

Mummey, D.L., M.C. Rillig and W.E. Holben. 2005. Neighboring plant influences on arbuscular mycorrhiza fungal community composition as assessed by T-RFLP analysis. Plant and Soil: 271:83-90.

Holben, W.E., K.P. Feris, A. Kettunen, and J.H.A. Apajalahti. 2004. GC fractionation enhances microbial community diversity assessment and detection of minority populations of bacteria by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70:2263-2270.

Feris, K.P., P.W. Ramsey, M. Rillig, J.N. Moore, J.E. Gannon, and W.E. Holben. 2004. Determining rates of change and evaluating group-level resiliency differences in hyporheic microbial communities in response to fluvial heavy metal deposition. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70:4756-4765.

Callaway, R.M., G.C. Thelen, A. Rodriguez, and W.E. Holben. 2004. Soil biota and exotic plant invasion. Nature 427:731-733.

Feris, K. P. Ramsey, C. Frazar, J.N. Moore, J.E. Gannon, and W.E. Holben. 2003. Differences in hyporheic zone microbial community structure along a heavy metal contamination gradient. Appl Environ. Microbiol. 69:5563-5573.

Apajalahti. J.H.A., A.Kettunen, P.H. Nurminen, H. Jatila, and W.E. Holben. 2003. Selective plating underestimates abundance and shows differential recovery of Bifidobacterial species from human feces. Appl. Envir. Microbiol. 69:5731-5735.

Feris, K.P., P.W. Ramsey, C. Frazar, M.C. Rillig, J.E. Gannon, and W.E. Holben. 2003. Structure and seasonal dynamics of hyporheic zone microbial communities in free-stone rivers of the western United States. Microb. Ecol. 46:200-215.