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College of Humanities & Sciences

Biochemistry Program

People

Bruce Bowler
Professor and Director, Biochemistry Program

Office: Chem 311A

Phone: 406-243-6114

Email: bruce.bowler@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

Structural biology and functional studies of cytochrome c related to its role in apoptosis, protein dynamics, conformationally-gated electron transfer, protein folding and protein denatured states.


Klara Briknarova
Associate Professor

Office: Chem 111

Phone: (406) 243-4408

Email: klara.briknarova@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

Professor Briknarová uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, biochemical and biophysical techniques to study the structure, function and dynamics of biological macromolecules. A question of particular interest is how cell identity is established and maintained at the molecular level.


Kasper Hansen
Assistant Professor

Office ISB 216

Phone: (406) 243-4408

Email: kasper.hansen@umontana.edu


Walter Hill
Professor Emeritus

Office: Clapp Building 116

Phone: (406) 243-5140

Email: walter.hill@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

Professor Hill's laboratory studies ribosome structure, function and dynamics using a wide range of methods, including time-resolved quench-flow techniques aimed at characterizing the structural changes that occur during protein synthesis.


Brad Layton
Assistant Professor

Office:

Phone: 406-243-7865

Email: bradley.layton@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

Professor Layton is investigating the role that nanoscale biomechanics plays in predicting the fate of organisms under a variety of environmental stresses. Model organisms that he is studying include Arabidopsis thaliana and Trichodesmium erythraeum. He is also working on a formal relationship between anthropogenic entropy acceleration and information.


Stephen Lodmell
Professor

Office: CHCB 202

Phone: 406-243-6393

Email: stephen.lodmell@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

We are investigating how the structure of HIV RNA regulates viral replicative processes including translation of viral proteins, encapsidation, splicing, and RNA dimerization.


Michele McGuirl
Associate Professor

Office: CHCB 204

Phone: 406-243-4404

Email: Email: michele.mcguirl@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

My laboratory is devoted to understanding structure/function relationships in proteins.   There are three current areas of biochemical research. (1) We study the prion protein, the causative agent of infectious amyloid diseases including scrapie, mad cow disease, and Creutzfeld-Jakob disease. (2) We study how amino acid radicals modulate electron transfer through the polypeptide backbone using the blue copper protein azurin. (3) We study the structure and mechanism of tyramine beta monooxygenase, a copper enzyme involved in neurotransmitter biogenesis.


Douglas Raiford
Assistant Professor

Office: Social Science 412

Phone: (406) 243-5605

Email: douglas.raiford@mso.umt.edu

Faculty Details Page

My research focuses on the application of principles from computer science on problems in biology and biochemistry. The approaches practiced by members of my lab include those drawn from the fields of data mining, evolutionary computation, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, multivariate analysis, self-evolving Markov models, dynamic programming techniques, simulation, and modeling. We have collaborated on problems in identifying and measuring the similarity of RNA secondary structure, investigating global forces involved in genomic and proteomic evolution, non-alignment techniques in evaluating phylogenetic relationships, and analyzing metagenomic data.


Alexander (Sandy) Ross
Professor and Dean of the Graduate School

Office: Chem 013A

Phone: 406-243-6026

Email: sandy.ross@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

The Ross group uses biological fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate protein-protein and protein membrane interactions in initiation of blood coagulation and protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions in regulation of transcription and repair of damaged DNA.


Brent Ryckman
Assistant Professor

Office: Clapp 115

Phone: 406-243-6948

Email: brent.ryckman@mso.umt.edu

Faculty Details Page

Molecular virology. Focus on interactions among herpes virus envelope glycoproteins that mediate attachment and entry into different cell types.


Scott Samuels
Professor

Office: Charles H. Clapp 207

Phone: (406) 243-6145

Email: Scott.Samuels@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

Our laboratory dissects the role of small RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, alternative sigma factors, DNA-binding proteins, and DNA supercoiling in the regulation of transcription during the enzootic cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease.


Valeriy Smirnov
Assistant Professor

Office: Interdisciplinary Science Building, room 104A

Phone: (406) 243-6470

Email: valeriy.smirnov@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

My research is mechanisms of metalloenzymes, characterization of reactive intermediates, activation of dioxygen and organic substrates during enzyme catalysis, proton-coupled electron transfer, use/theoretical interpretation of isotope effects in metabolic and environmental processes.


Stephen Sprang
Professor and Director of CBSD

Office: ISB 106A

Phone: 406-243-6028

Email: stephen.sprang@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

Our laboratory is interested in the structural biology of cellular signaling through heterotrimeric G proteins. We use the tools of X-ray crystallography, enzymology and molecular biology to explore and understand the structural and chemical mechanisms by which G proteins regulate cellular processes and are themselves regulated.


Kent Sugden
Professor

Office: Chem 306

Phone: 406-243-4193

Email: kent.sugden@umontana.edu

Faculty Details Page

My research focuses on the mechanism of interaction of metal complexes with biomolecules that can lead to the formation of genetic aberrations such as mutations, cancer and toxicity. My primary metal of interest is chromium, which in the +6 oxidation state, is a known human carcinogen. One method by which chromium may induce cancer in humans is through oxidative damage to nucleic acids. Our research group is focused on the mechanism by which this oxidative chemistry may occur and the resulting lesions that are formed on DNA that can give rise to carcinogenesis.


Ekaterina Voronina
Assistant Professor

Office: HS 513A

Phone: (406) 243-4254

Email: ekaterina.voronina@umontana.edu


University of Montana

Biochemistry Program

Phone: (406) 243-4022 | Fax: (406) 243-4227

32 Campus Drive | Missoula, MT 59812

andrew1.ranck@umontana.edu