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Jennifer Moxley Jennifer Moxley

Join us for a poetry reading with Jennifer Moxley on Friday, October 24, 7 p.m. in the Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall. Moxley is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Clampdown (Flood 2009) and The Middle Room (Subpress 2008), a book of essays, and a memoir. In addition, she has translated three books from the French. In 2005 she was granted the Lynda Hull Poetry Award from Denver Quarterly. Her poem "Behind the Orbits" was included by Robert Creeley in The Best American Poetry 2002. She was the poetry editor for The Baffler from 1997-2010 and a contributing editor to The Poker 2003-2008. Moxley is Professor of Poetry and Poetics at the University of Maine. (Photo credit: John Sarsgard)


Fall 2014


  • Ed Skoog's (MFA 1996) second book, Rough Day, won the 2014 Washington State Best Book Award for Poetry.
  • Kim Zupan (MFA 1984) reads from his novel, Ploughmen, at Shakespeare & Co. in Missoula on Tuesday, October 21, 7 p.m.
  • Elisabeth Geier’s (MFA 2011) essay, “Going to Movies with Girls,” is published in Toast.
  • Check out Aryn Kyle’s (MFA 2003) piece on tumblr called “This dog is a Foreigner” about living and writing in France.
  • Philip Schaefer (MFA 2014) has two poems published in the new Alice Blue issue 24. Josh Fomon (MFA 2013) has three poems in issue 23.
  • Catherine Moore's (MFA 2008) essay, "O Beulah Land," was published in Oxford American: The Southern Magazine of Good Writing.
  • JP Kemmick's (third year MFA) essay, "Lay of the Land: City Boy," is published in Last Best News.
  • Debra Earling's novel, Perma Red, is being made into a movie. You can check it out on Facebook.
  • Ryan Bells (MFA 2014) story "Mountain Passage" won Silver in the category of U.S./Canada Travel at the 2014 Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Awards.
  • Khaty Xiong’s (MFA 2013) poem, “Looser,” has been published by Interrupture. Her book of poems, Poor Anima, is forthcoming from Apogee Press.
  • Jeremy Pataky (MFA 2007) will be on the poetry faculty of GetLit! in Spokane this spring.
  • Amy Linn's (MFA 1993) story, "Never Say No," is published in Narrative.
  • Brendan Fitzgerald's (second year MFA) essay, "The Combination Lock Test" is published in The Morning News, Oct. 9.
  • Alice Bolin 's (MFA 2011) essay, "Montana Noir," is published in Avidly, a Los Angeles Review of Books channel.
  • Craig Barnes' (MFA 2011) story, "In Our Defense," is published in American Short Fiction.
  • Caylin Capra-Thomas' (second year MFA) poems, "Poem with Susan Sarandon" and "Poem with Geena Davis," have been accepted for publication in the next issue of Bat City Review.
  • Jeff Gailus (second year MFA) is one of 365 contributors to a new anthology called Global Chorus about the environmental future of the planet.
  • Allison Linville (second year MFA) has four poems that will be  published with Cascadia Review this week. She and JP Kemmick (third year MFA) will be reading at the Wilderness and the Human Imagination event in the Theta Rho Room of the Mansfield Library on the UM Campus, Wednesday, October 8, 7 p.m.
  • Sarah Kahn (second year MFA) has a story published in the Cobalt Review.
  • Jeremy Pataky (MFA 2007) will be on the faculty at the Kachemak Bay Writers' Conference in June.
  • Kevin Canty's "Story, With Bird," is in the October 6 issue of the New Yorker.
  • Natalie Peeterse' (MFA 2002) poem, "Worksheet," was selected by the Watershed Review for a Best of the Net anthology.
  • Caylin-Capra Thomas' (second year MFA) poem, "Interior Landscape," was nominated by The Boiler for a Best of the Net Award.
  • Rachel Mindell's (third year MFA and MA) poetry chapbook, Teardrop and a Bullet, has been selected for publication with Dancing Girl Press.
  • Josh Fomon's (MFA 2013) poetry book, Though We Bled Meticulously, has been accepted for publication with Black Ocean Press.
  • Aryn Kyle (MFA 2003) has an essay in Spent: Exposing Our Complicated Relationship with Shopping, an anthology by Kerry Cohen.
  • Rachel Finkelstein (MFA 2014) and Nils Michals (MFA 2000) both have poems in the current issue of Small Portions.
  • David Gates' story, "Locals," is in the current issue of The Paris Review.
  • Brett Puryear's (second year MFA) essay, "Lines Westward," is published in Sporting Classics Daily.
  • Micah Fields' (undergraduate student) essay, "Zeh Mutaasif Yum," is published in War, Literature, and the Arts Journal.
  • Andrew Martin's (MFA 2013) essay, "On Donald Antrim and the Literature of Anxiety," appears in Brooklyn Magazine.
  • Josh Fomon (MFA 2013) and Colin Post (MFA 2013) both have poems featured in Deluge, Issue Three.
  • Jordan Konkol (third year MFA) is the new poetry editor of Dog Pond.
  • Kim Covill's (second year MFA) essay, "Waking Up Outside," was selected to be read at the Forest Service's 50th Anniversary of Wilderness Celebration.
  • Robert Stubblefield is teaching a workshop and reading at the Eastern Oregon Word Round-Up.
  • Barry Kitterman (MFA 1981) received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts for work on his new novel.
  • John Barnes (MFA 1988), who has 30 commercially published books, will be appearing at the MileHiCon in Denver on October 24 - 26.
  • Jon Davis' (MFA 1985) recent projects include two limited edition chapbooks, Thelonious Sphere (Q Ave. Press, 2014) and Loving Horses (Palace Press, 2014), and a limited edition art book in collaboration with the artist Jamison Chas Banks, Heteronymy: An Anthology (La Nana Creek Press, forthcoming 2015). Dayplaces, which Davis translated from the Arabic with the author, Iraqi poet Naseer Hassan, is forthcoming from Tebot Bach Press in 2015.
  • Stephanie Land's (BA 2014) essay, "MFA vs. Mom," was published in the Sept. 16 issue of Mamalode.
  • Brian Kevin's (MFA 2009) travel memoir, The Footloose American: Following the Hunter S. Thompson Trail Across South America, was reviewed Sept. 11 by Suzanne MacNeille in The New York Times.
  • Peter Schumacher's (MFA 2013) story, "Mars" is published in The Collagist, September 2014, Issue 62.
  • Amy Ratto-Parks' (MFA 2004) collection of poems, Song of Days: Torn and Mended, has been accepted for publication by Alice Blue Books.

Featured Books

Rings

Rings by Jasmine Dreame Wagner (MFA 2010) is the winner of the 2014 Kelsey Street Press FIRSTS! Contest judged by Elizabeth Robinson. In this series of first books by emerging writers, Kelsey Street Press continues to link its editorial policy of addressing the marginalization of women writers to a poetics of allowance that encourages women to write directly from their own creative imperatives.


Tom Connor's GiftDavid Allan Cates' (MFA 1992)  new novel, Tom Connor's Gift, came out with Bangtail Press on October 15.

“David Allan Cates’s Tom Connor’s Gift is extraordinary. The prose is ravishing, the characters are surprising and irresistible, and many of its scenes are so intensely moving that they bring tears of gratitude and pleasure. The book praises long marriage and long friendship, but what I especially appreciate about its vision is how sexually liberating it is for both men and women. Cates is a fierce and fearless writer! One finishes this novel feeling wiser, more alive, and spiritually refreshed.”
— David Huddle


It Looks Worse Than I Am Laurie Blauner's (MFA 1980) poetry book, It Looks Worse Than I Am, is coming out with What Books Press in October. There will be a release party and reading at Open Books in Seattle on Friday, October 17 at 7:30 pm.


See You in Paradise    

 J. Robert Lennon's (MFA 1995) latest collection of stories, See You in Paradise, is coming out in November with Graywolf in America (left) and simultaneously with Serpent Tail in Britain (right). Lennon is reading at Shakespeare & Co. in Missoula on Friday, November 7, 7 p.m.


SHaking Out the DeadKate M. Cholewa  (MFA 1990) reads from her novel, Shaking Out the Dead (Story Plant, 2014), on Friday, September 5, 5:30 p.m. at Fact & Fiction.

Cholewa has crafted a masterful first novel that will change the way you relate to those around you. She has endowed the most unlikely cast of characters--a short order cook, an orphaned child, a Native American undertaker--with both the unerring wisdom of sages and strong doses of human frailty. There is no single protagonist in this tale. The handful of principle characters move through their lives together, sharing their joys and disappointments as best friends and family members do. The reader will often end up rooting for everyone involved.


Call Me Home Megan Kruse's (MFA 2010) Call Me home has been described by Kevin Canty as  "an urgent, beautiful book about love and its consequences, set against a backdrop of the unglamorized West. These characters will lodge themselves in your imagination, stick with you long after you’re done reading. A fine and original first novel."


The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac

Sharma Shields' (MFA 2004) new novel, The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac (Holt, 2015), is a dark, fantastical, multi-generational tale about a family whose patriarch is consumed by the hunt for the mythical, elusive sasquatch he encountered in his youth.


The Red Handkerchief

Daniel Shapiro's (MFA 1980) The Red Handkerchief and Other Poems will be published in Fall 2014 by Dos Madres Press. He is also the author of the collection Child with a Swan's Wings (Diaz Grey Editores, 2013) and the translator of Cipango, by Chilean poet Tomas Harris (2010); Cipango received a starred review in Library Journal and was also praised in The American Poetry Review, Translation, and World Literature Today.  Shapiro has been awarded translation fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and PEN.  He is Director of Literature and Editor of Review:  Literature and Arts of the Americas at the Americas Society in New York.


Walking the BonesMelissa Mylchreest's (MFA 2012) new poetry collection, Walking the Bones, winner of the Dorothy Brunsman Poetry Prize, has been released by Bear Star Press.


Yesterday, the cranes gathered
the evening beneath their wings
and rode over the valley,
the string of them like the body
of a snake, their going an old
and holy thing.  --from "Almanac”


elsewhereScott Alexander Jones (MFA 2009) has two books of poetry coming out this summer: elsewhere (Black Lawrence Press) and Carpe Demons (Unsolicited Press). You can read an excerpt from Carpe Demons in DIAGRAM.


Footloose American

Brian Kevin (MFA 2009) is traveling the country reading from his new book, The Footloose American: Following the Hunter S. Thompson Trail Across South America (Broadway Books).


On the Road to Find OutRachel Toor's (MFA 2006) young adult novel On the Road to Find Out (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) combines three of Toor's topics of expertise from previous books: the college entrance process, a love of animals and running. Toor introduces Alice, a high school senior who has been rejected from the college of her dreams, the only school where she applied. Alice, who gets tired of complaining to her pet rat Walter, takes up running and experiences challenges that help her learn to endure when the going suddenly gets tougher than she ever imagined. On the Road to Find Out has been praised by Kirkus Reviews as "warm, funny and wise." 


Black RiverSarah Hulse (B.A. 2006) who publishes under the name S.M. Hulse, finished her first novel, Black River, during her year as the McCreight Fiction Fellow. Hulse has signed a two-book contract with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, who will publish Black River in January 2015.


Cumberland

Megan Gannon 's (MFA 2002) debut novel, Cumberland, was released by Apprentice House in February. Here's the storyline... in the fictional coastal town of Cumberland, Georgia, fifteen-year-old twin sisters Ansel and Isabel Mackenzie have lived with their eccentric grandmother since a car accident killed their parents and paralyzed Isabel. Over the past seven years the responsibility of caring for her sister has fallen increasingly on Ansel. However, as she cultivates a romantic relationship with a local boy, as well as an artistic apprenticeship with a visiting photographer, Ansel’s growing desire for independence compromises her ability to care for her sister, threatening their sororal connection, and ultimately, Isabel’s life.